Entering into a new employment contract, or renewing an existing agreement, can be one of the most important decisions you ever make. In addition to salary figures, there are many things to consider in the employment arena, as many important issues can be in the "fine print." For example, what happens if you're laid off — is there a severance agreement in place? The Rubin Law Corporation can provide the following services:

  • Advice on contract terms and provisions, as well as definition of terms so the employee understands the agreement
  • Explanation of enforceability of contract under state or federal law
  • Redrafting of key provisions identified through discussions and analysis together with the executive or manager
  • Pointing out key issues embodied in clauses such as non-compete, non-disclosure, proprietary information, trade secrets and the like
  • Desirable contract additions or subtractions (such as termination only "for cause," adding stock options, vacation, bonuses, explicit severance pay provisions, etc., geographic locations, travel restrictions and so on.)
  • Supplying the tools necessary for negotiation with prospective/current employer. In many instances, the law firm will be "behind the scenes," and the client will be directly involved in the negotiation.

Once employed, The Rubin Law Corporation can assist you:

  • Identify the options in your situation by carefully reviewing all the facts, the company handbook, any writings (including e-mails, notes, memoranda letters or other pertinent documents)
  • Determine your obligations based on your existing contract, handbook, letters, writings or other documents
  • Ensure your legal rights by interpreting these documents in light of a detailed examination of the facts
  • Execute a strategy as it pertains to your situation after a thorough analysis of facts and law has been completed

What Constitutes a Breach of Contract?

If one or more of the terms in a valid employment contract, whether written or verbal or some combination, is violated by either an employee or employer, this is typically called breach of contract. In the case of an employee, it is frequently compensation terms that are at issue, having to do with the payment of bonuses or commissions.

Learn the answers to other frequently asked questions by visiting our FAQ page.

Contact Our Experienced Employment Contract Lawyers to Advocate for You

Contact us online or call 310.598.2416 to schedule a confidential consultation to discuss how disability discrimination affects you. Know your rights as an employee. As experienced disability law attorneys, we can take action to preserve your rights and achieve your goals.

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